Qabbalat Shabbat: Friday, 6:00 p.m. Torah Study: Saturday, 9:00-11:00 a.m. Weekday Minyan: 6:15 p.m.

TI Cares

At Temple Israel, there is a culture of caring for, and about, each other. Caring is contagious, and being there for each other creates a more connected and compassionate congregation. TI Cares ensures that support and assistance are available to everyone within our synagogue family. We offer support and help in times of sorrow and to offer congratulations in times of joy.

 

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“Lotsa Helping Hands”

providing meals for those in need

“Lotsa Helping Hands” is a website we use to organize our community to provide meals to families who have been struck with illness or are sitting shiva. When there is a need, we post it on the website for members see, who then are able to choose a night for preparing and delivering a meal. Please consider deepening your involvement in Temple Israel in this meaningful and personal manner.

Google Group

community@tisrael.org

The mission for community@tisrael.org is to generate conversations and connections that will strengthen our Temple Israel community. To join our Google group send your name and e-mail.

Holiday Happenings

High Holy Days, Chanukah, Purim

Prior to the High Holy Days, apples and honey from local farms and vendors are delivered to those in our congregation who has suffered a loss in the past year. This gesture prior to the New Year is to wish each of them a year of comfort and sweet memories to sustain them.

We prepare Chanukah gift packages that are sent to our college student’s dorms and apartments. This activity lets the college students feel as though they are still a part of this community.

On Purim gift packages are created for our elderly who may be homebound or haven’t been able to get to the Temple for various reasons. Volunteers gather for an inter-generational food preparation session in our kitchen and then a cadre of volunteers deliver the packages.

Email our Co-Chairs!

Resources

Diamant, Anita. Saying Kaddish. BM 712 .D53199.
Explains Kaddish, Shiva, and Yahrzeit customs.  For readers who are paying a shiva visit for the first time, this book provides suggestions for what to expect, say, bring, and do.  There is extensive and sensitive treatment of questions on how to bury and mourn non-Jews within a Jewish community.

Greenberg, Sidney. A Treasury of Comfort. BF 575 .G7G68 1994.
This anthology of short poems and meditations on loss would be good to read aloud or with someone.  The short selections are so diverse that there is sure to be some helpful word for any reader.

Heilman, Samuel C. When a Jew Dies. BM712 .H45
More scholarly than purely practical, this book provides an overview of death rituals in Jewish law and a detailed understanding of how a chevra kaddisha prepares a dead body for burial.

Kay, Alan. A Jewish Book of Comfort. BM712 .K385. Over 175 inspirational readings to comfort the mourner. Explains traditions and rituals of mourning

Levine, Aaron. To Comfort the Bereaved : A Guide for Mourners and Those Who Visit Them. BM712 .L43
Topics in this practical book include the traditions for the meal of condolence, visitation obligations, visiting the house of mourning, and what to say/what not to say. The book is laid out as an outline.

To Honor and Respect: A Program and Resource Guide for Congregations on Sacred Aging HQ1063.6 .A39
Discusses how communities can provide support for caregivers and create new Jewish rituals around aging.

Laurie Pass, and Ellin Reisner, eds. Family Caregiver Handbook: Finding Elder Care Resources in MassachusettsHQ1064.U5B6 2007. This handbook is designed with the caregiver in mind. It poses basic questions caregivers need to ask – and answer – as they design elder care plans and make elder care choices. It explains how services are organized, and has a glossary to define some unfamiliar elder care terms. It is a “gateway” to key elder care organizations across the Commonwealth, providing telephone numbers, locations and website addresses so that caregivers can find the most appropriate resources closest to their own community. Two of the authors, Ann Bookman and Ellin Reisner, are Temple Israel members.

How To Visit the Sick in Judaism
A rabbi offers advice about how to perform the mitzvah of visiting the sick with wisdom, discretion, and sensitivity. By Rabbi Bradley Artson: Abridged from It’s A Mitzvah!

Promise to Mary: A Story of Faith in Action. HV530 .J4
Here is the story of Faith in Action, the acclaimed nationwide grant program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation that brings together Americans of all faiths to provide volunteer care and support to people in their communities who are confined to their homes becomes of a chronic health condition or disability. Through a series of revealing in-depth interviews…”Promise to Mary” provides a unique and often profoundly moving glimpse into the lives of some of our most isolated and forgotten neighbors – as well as the remarkable volunteers, from all faiths and all walks of life, who have come to their aid.

Fox, Mem. Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge. Pic Fox. A small boy tries to discover the meaning of memory so he can restore that of an elderly friend.

Polacco, Patricia. Mrs. Katz and Tush. Pic Pol. A young African-American boy, Larnel, visits Mrs. Katz, looks after her, and gives her a little tail-less cat whom she names Tush. As their lives entwine, Mrs. Katz and Larnel share food and holidays and the knowledge that their people’s pasts both involved slavery and discrimination.

How to Be a Host, How to Be a Guest by Rabbi Louis Jacobs.
Jewish ethical literature provides practical, down-to-earth guidelines on how to behave towards one’s guests and towards one’s hosts. Jacobs’ sources real hospitality is more than just having friends visit in your home. It involves directly providing for wayfarers and others who might be in need of a meal and of people with whom to share it.

Connect with Us

Sue Misselbeck3

Sue Misselbeck

Executive Coordinator for Cantor Einhorn, Rabbi Friedman, Rabbi Mehlman & TILLI

617-566-3960 x117

susanm@tisrael.org